Application Development: Problems and Solutions

Application development is the necessity of each business. With smartphone (and tablet) users spiking over the recent years – everybody is seeing the potential that’s reserved in the field of mobile application development.

However, application development isn’t easy.

  • Android application development struggles against the non-spending nature of Play Store users and the ways to employ in-app ads and purchases.
  • iOS application development is setback by its limited user base where it has a large number of people willing to spend but the App Store doesn’t really penetrate as much as three-quarters of the middle class families chunk.
  • Application development in general poses a lot of issues like bad design, bugs and errors, overwhelming competition, lack of exposure, and so on.
  • Non-technical people can create apps using DIY tools, but to be in the industry as a professional, one needs to learn multiple programming languages and paradigms.

Inspired by these factors, one might think the field of mobile application development is tough to survive in. Well, that’s not the case at all. Let’s find some common problems and try to solve them.

1. Application development overwhelms me
Mobile Application Development
can be overwhelming if you’re not sure about what exactly you want to be.

Be clear about it. Do you want to be a full-time app developer? Well, you can’t hide away from the fact that you need proper training and a good knowledge of programming languages you’ll be working on (like Java for Android development).

If you just have an idea but no coding skills or application development know-how then you still have many options like hiring a developer, partnering with a friend who knows coding, taking a paid course to learn development, or learning through free resources like tutorials and forums.

2. The app doesn’t look good
Mobile application development is mostly about the looks. In the past, bad-looking apps could still work out successfully if they presented a good enough utility or solution.

But right now, the market is toughly contested. Design – that includes user interface – needs to be soothing, clear, and modern. Apps should look native, as well as function natively.

Good functionality or user experience can only be built upon good design. If your design is repelling, there’s no use for your brilliant functionality.

3. There’s too much competition
Competition is too much, no wonder in that. There are millions of apps on App Store and Google Play. Windows Store is also picking up, especially with its new feature to port existing Windows programs as Windows Store apps.

So how do you shine? It’s not like if you have an app idea for a mainstream utility, you won’t taste success.

  • Think what’s missing in the apps already serving a similar purpose.
  • Learn from competitor analysis.
  • Look out for what people like most, and what features are unnecessary from the point-of-view of an app user.

Using all these data, you’ll be able to craft a better app for the same idea.

Other considerations
Many other problems are involved in application development.

  • Need feedback, criticism, and technical support? Well just run a Google search for your issue or for the latest results about best support forums. Internet is very helpful if you know how to ask your question.
  • Platform decision problems: First launch for one platform, keeping in mind your target audience. Then make necessary changes once your app is popular and launch for other platform(s).

Related Articles:

Effective Application Development- Planning and Strategy

The  Do  and  Dont  of  iOS  Application Development

6 Mobile Game Development Trends in 2016

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